Utah has many amazing hikes and national parks, something that can be easy to take for granted. "It's a shame if we're not going out and taking advantage of the incredible nature that's around us," said Chad Taylor, general manager of Utah.com, a sister company of the Deseret News. To help you seize the day and venture out, here are 21 of the best hikes in the state, according to Taylor and also Dave Wallace of the Cache Hikers organization. The hikes are organized into four regions. So get outside. There's something for everyone.

Cache Valley: White Pine Lake
Michael Radice

Location: Logan Canyon, Tony Grove area

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: Yes

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 7.4 miles roundtrip

Fee: $6 per car, per day (Tony Grove parking lot)

When: Ideal from mid-June to early October

Dogs allowed: Yes

Family friendly: Suitable for older children and teenagers

Why: This glacial lake is beautiful, “surrounded by cliffs and peaks, with fields of wildflowers along the trail,” Wallace said. It's a popular destination with a fairly easy hike, moderate elevation gain and a campground at the lake, according to Wallace.

Naomi Peak
Steve Baker

Location: Logan Canyon, Tony Grove area

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, trailhead

Length: 6.6 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 1,940 feet

Fee: $6 per car per day for the Tony Grove area

When: Most popular from end of June to early October

Family friendly: Suitable for teenagers and adults

Dogs allowed: Yes

Why: Naomi Peak (also called Mount Naomi) is “the highest peak in the Bear River Range,” Wallace said, adding that there is an abundance of wildflowers on the trail. Those who venture here will see stunning views of Flattop, Smithfield Canyon, Mount Jardine and Mount Elmer, according to the Cache Hikers website.

Crimson Trail
Kelly Sederholm, left, and LaDene Jeppesen, on the Crimson Trail in Logan Canyon.

Location: Logan Canyon, near Guinavah Campground

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 6 miles roundtrip (or 5 miles roundtrip with the Riverside Nature Trail)

Elevation gain: 1,000 feet

Fee: No

When: April to October

Family friendly: Yes, for older children and teens

Dogs allowed: Yes

Why: Come and see the band of cliffs known locally as the “China Wall,” according to Wallace. Even the name has historic relevance, coming from “the crimson and gold colors of the Old Brigham Young College, now Logan High School,” he said.

Temple Fork Sawmill Trail
Dave Wallace

Location: Logan Canyon, Temple Fork Road

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Yes

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 5.6 miles roundtrip

Fee: No

When: April to October

Family friendly: Yes

Dogs allowed: Yes

Why: This is a good hike for families, following a pleasant stream with beaver ponds, according to Wallace. “Timber from this mill was used to build the Logan Temple,” he said.

Limber Pine Trail
Natalie Crofts

Location: Logan Canyon, Bear Lake area

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Nearby

Length: 1.5 mile loop

Fee: No

When: June to October

Family friendly: Yes

Dogs allowed: Yes

Why: This is a great trail for young families, Wallace said. It’s “an easy loop trail with interpretive signs, views of Bear Lake and an interesting limber pine tree,” which is several trees merged into one, he said.

Many thanks to Wallace and Dan Zamecnik of the Cache Hikers organization, Hilary Shughart of the Bridgerland Audubon Society, and logancanyonhiking.com for the information about Cache Valley.

Salt Lake County: Donut Falls
Adam Provance

Location: Big Cottonwood Canyon

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 3.5 miles roundtrip

Fee: No

When: Summer months

Dogs allowed: No

Family friendly: Yes

Why: It’s a popular hike that everyone loves, with a rock shaped like a donut and amazing waterfalls, according to Taylor. “The trail is great, the trail is super scenic, and the payoff at the end is awesome,” he said.

The Living Room
Steve Baker

Location: “The trailhead is near the Natural History Museum of Utah, just off the Bonneville Shoreline Trail" utah.com says. Look for the yellow 174 sign, which marks the beginning of the trail.

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: No

Restrooms: No

Length: 4 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 1,010 feet

Fee: No

When: April to October

Dogs allowed: Yes, on leash

Family friendly: Yes, for older children and teenagers

Why: The sofa might not be as comfortable as the one in your living room, but the view is better. “It’s kind of a bucket list hike for a lot of people,” Taylor said. According to Taylor, hiking at sunset is the ideal time because of the view looking west.

Lake Blanche
Gina Herbert

Location: Twin Peaks Wilderness Area, trailhead up Big Cottonwood Canyon at the Mill B South Fork trailhead

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: No

Restrooms: Yes, near trailhead

Length: 7 miles roundtrip

When: Summer months

Family friendly: Yes, for older children and teenagers

Why: Just look at the picture: It’s beautiful. You can also swim in the lake after the hike up. “The lake and the mountain peak are super awesome,” Taylor said.

Cecret Lake
Utah.com

Location: Top of Little Cottonwood Canyon Road

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 1.5 miles roundtrip

Fee: No

When: Spring and summer

Dogs allowed: No

Family friendly: Yes

Why: The wildflowers and the view are something you don’t get to see every day, and it’s a family-friendly hike.

Mount Olympus Summit
Gordon A Hyde

Location: Trailhead is located on the east side of Wasatch Boulevard in Salt Lake

Difficulty: Strenuous

Campsites: No

Restrooms: No

Length: 7.5 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 4,100 feet

Fee: No

When: Summer months

Dogs allowed: No

Family friendly: No, unless seasoned hikers

Why: “Who doesn’t want to say they’ve climbed a mountain, and climbed to the summit of a mountain?” Taylor said.

Utah County: Battle Creek Falls
Adam Provance

Location: East bench of Pleasant Grove

Difficulty: Easy

Restrooms: Nearby, Kiwanis Park

Length: 1.2 miles roundtrip

Fee: No

When: Summer months

Dogs allowed: Yes

Family friendly: Yes

Why: This is an easy, family-friendly hike. You can soak up the sun, and then get soaked in the waterfalls (no obligation to do the latter). “My kids love it because it’s super easy, super short, but then they get to go to waterfalls and they can kind of play around in the waterfalls,” Taylor said.

Y Trail on Y Mountain
Ravell Call

Location: Provo

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: No

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 2.4 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 980 feet

Fee: No

When: Summer months

Dogs allowed: Yes

Family friendly: Yes

Why: If you live in Utah County or are just visiting, you have to hike the Y, according to Taylor. “A cool time for people to do it, too, is if you hike the Y early, early in the morning of the Fourth of July," Taylor said. "It’s a great place to watch the balloon launches in Provo for the Freedom Days Festival."

Timpanogos Cave
Scott G Winterton

Location: American Fork Canyon

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes

Length: 3.5 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 1,160 feet

Cave tour fees, according to the National Park Service website:


  • Adults (age 16 and older) — $8

  • Adults (age 16 and older) — $8

  • Junior (age 6-15) — $6

  • Child (age 3-5) — $4

  • Infant (age 0-2) — Free (but requires a ticket)

  • Senior/Access (Golden Age/Access) pass holders — half price


When: mid-May to mid-October

Dogs allowed: Service animals

Family friendly: Yes

Why: You get to go into an actual cave, which in and of itself is amazing. “People come from all over the country and world to visit Timpanogos Cave,” Taylor. said

Stewart Falls
Jan Munger

Location: Aspen Grove, on Alpine Loop Road

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 3.5 miles roundtrip

Fee: $6 for a three-day parking pass

When: Early spring to mid-fall

Dogs allowed: Yes

Family friendly: Yes

Why: Stewart Falls is a scenic and photogenic hike, according to utah.com. It has waterfalls, the hike goes through a beautiful forest, and the colored leaves in autumn are gorgeous.

Mount Nebo
Ray Borden

Location: From Payson, take the Nebo Scenic Loop road and drive to trailhead

Difficulty: Strenuous

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 9 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: 3,800 feet

Fee: No

When: Summer months

Dogs allowed: Yes

Family friendly: Suitable for older teenagers or seasoned hikers

Why: Mount Nebo is the highest peak in the Wasatch. “What a cool sense of accomplishment to climb the highest peak along the Wasatch Front,” Taylor said.

Southern Utah and the national parks: Delicate Arch
Southwest Adventure Tours

Location: Arches National Park

Difficulty: Moderate

Restrooms: In visitor center

Length: 3 miles roundtrip:

Fees:


  • Free for youths 15 and younger

  • $10 per person if walk-in or on bicycle (lasts 7 days)

  • I$10 per person if walk-in or on bicycle (lasts 7 days)

  • $15 per motorcycle (lasts for 7 days)

  • $25 per vehicle (lasts for 7 days)

  • $50 per vehicle for Southeast Utah Parks Pass; see utah.com for details (lasts one month)

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


Length: 3 miles roundtrip

When: Ideal in spring and fall

Dogs allowed: No (allowed into the park but not on trails)

Family friendly: Yes

Why: If you haven’t done this one, it had better be at the top of your list. This is one of the most iconic hikes in Utah, according to Taylor, and people come from all around the world to see it.

Navajo Loop
Kristin Nichols

Location: Bryce Canyon National Park

Difficulty: Moderate

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: In visitor center

Length: 1.3 miles roundtrip

Fees:


  • $15 per person

  • $25 per motorcycle

  • $30 per vehicle (lasts for 7 days)

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


When: Ideal in spring and fall

Dogs allowed: No (allowed into the park but not on trails)

Family friendly: Yes, may be difficult for young children

Why: This is one of the best hikes in Bryce Canyon in terms of experience. You’ll get the chance to see the hoodoos from the rim, which is an amazing sight, according to Taylor.

Hickman Bridge

Location: Capitol Reef National Park

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 2 miles roundtrip

Park fees:


  • $7 per person, bicycle or walk-in (lasts for 7 days)

  • $10 per vehicle or motorcycle (lasts for 7 days)

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


When: Ideal in spring and fall

Dogs allowed: No (allowed into the park but not on trails)

Family friendly: Yes

Why: This hike is good for adults and children. The payoff at the end, being under that bridge, is great, Taylor said.

Red Cliffs Nature Trail

Location: St. George

Difficulty: Easy

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Yes, at trailhead

Length: 1.5 miles roundtrip, according to hikestgeorge.com

Fees:


  • $5 per vehicle

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


When: Ideal in spring and fall

Dogs allowed: Yes, on a leash

Family friendly: Yes

Why: It’s short and beautiful, and if you’re there at the right time, you might even be able to swim in the stream or slide down the waterfall, according to utah.com.

Peekaboo Trail

Location: Canyonlands National Park

Difficulty: Strenuous

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: In visitor center

Length: 10 miles roundtrip

Park fees:


  • Free for youths 15 and younger

  • $10 per person, bicycle or walk-in (lasts 7 days)

  • $15 per motorcycle (lasts 7 days)

  • $25 per vehicle (lasts 7 days)

  • $50 for Southeast Utah Group Annual Pass, good for Arches, Canyonlands, Hovenweep, and Natural Bridges (lasts through the year)

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


When: Ideal in spring and fall

Dogs allowed: No (allowed into the park but not on trails)

Why: This is a good one for adventure-seekers who are also seasoned hikers, according to Taylor. Enjoy both sandstone mazes and scenic views in this epic 10-mile trail.

Angel's Landing
Gary McKellar

Location: Zion National Park

Difficulty: Strenuous

Campsites: Nearby

Restrooms: Nearby

Length: 5 miles roundtrip

Elevation gain: About 1,500 feet

Park fees:


  • Free for youths 15 and younger

  • $15 per person, bicycle or walk-in (lasts 7 days)

  • $25 per motorcycle (lasts 7 days)

  • $30 per vehicle (lasts 7 days)

  • $50 per vehicle for Zion Annual Pass (lasts 12 months)

  • $80 per vehicle for America the Beautiful, a National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass (lasts 12 months)


When: Ideal in spring and fall

Family friendly: Suitable for teenagers and seasoned hikers

Dogs allowed: No (allowed into the park but not on trails)

Why: It’s not only the signature hike of Zion National Park, but Taylor said it’s also the main challenge and a point of pride, once completed. The views are fantastic, though it is difficult enough that it would be wise to go with other adults and teens.

“I’d highly recommend this spring, summer, fall, making more of a point to get out and hike and explore this amazing area that we have right here,” Taylor said.

Many thanks to Taylor for the information about Salt Lake County, Utah County and southern Utah and national parks.

Did we miss your favorite hike? Are there others you would recommend? Let us know in the comments.

Bethany Hanks and Brandon Klatskin are interns at Deseret Digital Media who enjoy the outdoors. They can be contacted at bhanks@deseretdigital.com and bklatskin@deseretdigital.com.